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Architectural Forensics

On April 3, 2006 St. Louis Post-Dispatch writer, Valerie Schremp Hahn, called Tim Kilby a "loghead" and he liked it! You see she knew Tim could date a cabin, the first step in a restoration, just by looking at it, using a technique he calls "Architectural Forensics" which is as much experience as it is science.  You can start with a book, like the FoxFire series as Tim Kilby did, but like any profession there's a lot more to it.  It takes years of "disecting" cabins, not just researching their history, but taking them apart and putting them back together, that is the experience that makes one an expert.   Sure you can do the reading and the research yourself, but does that cabin have that much time left? Hahn's article was picked up by The Washington Post and several others. 

For more .... http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/21/AR2006042100895.html

Belo

Forensics Architectural Forensics: application of scientific  methods and techniques in connection to the architecture of an historic building. HOW MUCH LIFE IS LEFT
roof Roof Materials: log, beams, shingles, tin, standing seam tin Can you tell the difference between a sawn beam or a hewn beam?
bones Construction techniques: fachwerk, horizontal log, verticle log, fachwerk w/brick, fachwerk w/log. Notching, Pegs, chinking, type of wood, placement Building techniques differed by culture, region, family heritage and available materials.  Can you identify yours?
footing Field stone, cut stone, chiseled stone, quarried stone, depth of sill, wine cellers Foundations and sills are the most overlooked items that can threaten a proper restoration and its future.
Would you recognize a hearthstone and know what it meant to a building like the Andrew Miller? Millerfireplace

   
 
 
 
 
 

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